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Pacific progress: emerging markets for sustainable fishing

by Patrick Caleo
Patrick Caleo explores the new platforms emerging for sustainable fisheries in the Pacific.
Sustainable fish counter in Coles

In Australia, there’s been a marked shift in the seafood industry. Now, it’s absolutely clear to the supply chain and the retailers that consumers want to know more about what they’re buying.  They might not always choose certified goods at the counter, but they want to know whether their products are sourced responsibly, where they come from – and that someone’s taking care of these things. That’s not just true of fish: a great deal of progress has been made in free range chicken eggs, pigs, and so on. For Australia’s food sector, sustainability has become part of doing business.

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Overfishing is as big a threat to humanity as it is to our oceans

by Dermot O’Gorman
WWF Australia CEO says John West Australia commitment to sustainable tuna will drive fishery reform.
Fishermen at work

There has never been a more urgent time for seafood businesses and fishing nations to make a commitment to sustainability. The world’s oceans are in trouble, with marine life plummeting and the people who are dependent on the sea for income and food left increasingly vulnerable. Data shows populations of fish and other marine vertebrates, including marine mammals, reptiles and birds have halved since 1970.

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MSC Ocean Ambassadors: Surfer and artist Felicity “Flick” Palmateer

MSC's Oceania team catches up with Sustainable Seafood Day and World Oceans Day ambassador, pro surfer and artist, Felicity "Flick" Palmateer.
Surfer and artist Flick Palmateer in front of her World Oceans Day mural, Bondi Beach, Sydney, Australia

Every year, MSC Oceania runs the Australia-wide Sustainable Seafood Day. In 2015, the team took to the sea, the streets and social media with their #ForTheSea hashtag and the help of advocates from all walks of life. Explorers, researchers, health practitioners, athletes joined to celebrate how choosing sustainable seafood can help keep our oceans healthy. One of these ‘Ocean Ambassadors’ is pro surfer and artist Felicity “Flick” Palmateer, who has also been involved in June’s World Oceans Day. The Oceania team caught with her to talk about her involvement and her love of the ocean.

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Krill, fishing and penguins

Dr David Agnew of the Marine Stewardship Council asks is krill fishing in the Antarctic damaging penguin populations?
gentoo-penguins

Krill, a tiny shrimp-like creature commonly used in fish oil supplements due to its high ‘Omega 3’ oil content, has been the subject of considerable discussion in environmental circles. I’ve talked before about why there won’t be a sudden expansion of the krill fishery and today I’d like to address a different issue: is krill fishing harming penguin populations? The suggestion that krill fishing is damaging krill and penguin populations in the Antarctic should be taken very seriously and is a topic I feel it is important to address.

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Patagonian toothfish: Fighting illegal fishing and protecting albatross

by Stephanie Good
12 years since Prince Charles wrote of his concerned for toothfish and albatross much has changed.
South Georgia Patagonian toothfish

Prince Charles’ letters, released yesterday, refer to the need to protect Patagonian toothfish. But what is so important about this creature and how have things changed since Prince Charles wrote of its plight to the then environment minister in October 2004?

Patagonian toothfish, also known as Chilean sea bass, lives in the cold waters of the Atlantic and sub-Antarctic. This slow growing fish generally lives for up to 24 years and grows to over two meters in length. It’s a species of huge ecological importance, but also supports fishing communities throughout Southern America and the Antarctic islands who fish it commercially for markets in USA, EU and Japan.

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