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How small islands make a big impact with sustainable seafood

by Rupert Howes
Our chief executive Rupert Howes discusses the huge impact of small island developing nations on the sustainable seafood market.
PNA tuna fishery - Fisherman looks out from the bridge of vessel

Just before Christmas 2011, an announcement was made that many in the fishing industry had been eagerly awaiting.  After two years of rigorous assessment against the Marine Stewardship Council’s (MSC) Fisheries Standard, one of the world’s largest tuna fisheries, the Parties to the Nauru Agreement (PNA) Western and Central Pacific skipjack fishery, achieved certification.

Operating off eight small island nations in the Pacific Ocean, the fishery provides 50% of the world’s total skipjack, the type of tuna which often ends up in sandwiches and salads.
The fishery’s reach extends to Papua New Guinea, Kiribati, the Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, Nauru, Palau, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu.

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MSC inside story: The world’s largest sustainable tuna fishery

Almost half of the world's tuna is landed by the PNA tuna fishery which is MSC certified as sustainable and well managed. Bill Holden explains what this means.
Bill Holden MSC Pacific fisheries manager

Originally from San Diego, Bill Holden landed a Peace Corp posting in Tonga, in the Pacific Islands and decided to stay on for a while. He owned and operated a tuna fishing business for more than 20 years before joining the MSC. He recently appeared in the National Geographic Wild documentary Mission: Save the Ocean, talking about the Parties to the Nauru Agreement (PNA) skipjack tuna fishery which operates in the western and central Pacific. We asked him a few questions about his work…

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