/ Category / fisheries management

How can orange roughy ever be considered a good fishery?

by Rohan Currey
Orange roughy

Dr Rohan Currey, the MSC’s fisheries standard director explains how the fortunes of the 1980’s ‘poster child of unsustainable fishing’ have turned.

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New Zealand orange roughy – a comeback story

by Patrick Cordue
From overfishing to sustainable delicacy: the story behind orange roughy
A Explorer during orange roughy survey trip

Patrick Cordue, the stock assessment author of the 2014 New Zealand orange roughy assessments, reflects on how the science and management of New Zealand’s orange roughy fisheries have advanced in the last two decades.

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Large vs small scale fishing – which is more sustainable?

by Megan Atcheson
Trawler at sea

Fisheries play a vital role in food security and global economies as well as social structures in coastal communities. With a growing recognition that individual livelihoods are heavily dependent on healthy fishery resources, more and more players in the fishing industry are making stronger commitments to sustainable fisheries management.

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Krill, fishing and penguins

Dr David Agnew of the Marine Stewardship Council asks is krill fishing in the Antarctic damaging penguin populations?
gentoo-penguins

Krill, a tiny shrimp-like creature commonly used in fish oil supplements due to its high ‘Omega 3’ oil content, has been the subject of considerable discussion in environmental circles. I’ve talked before about why there won’t be a sudden expansion of the krill fishery and today I’d like to address a different issue: is krill fishing harming penguin populations? The suggestion that krill fishing is damaging krill and penguin populations in the Antarctic should be taken very seriously and is a topic I feel it is important to address.

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Patagonian toothfish: Fighting illegal fishing and protecting albatross

by Stephanie Good
12 years since Prince Charles wrote of his concerned for toothfish and albatross much has changed.
South Georgia Patagonian toothfish

Prince Charles’ letters, released yesterday, refer to the need to protect Patagonian toothfish. But what is so important about this creature and how have things changed since Prince Charles wrote of its plight to the then environment minister in October 2004?

Patagonian toothfish, also known as Chilean sea bass, lives in the cold waters of the Atlantic and sub-Antarctic. This slow growing fish generally lives for up to 24 years and grows to over two meters in length. It’s a species of huge ecological importance, but also supports fishing communities throughout Southern America and the Antarctic islands who fish it commercially for markets in USA, EU and Japan.

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