Can reduction fisheries be sustainable?

by Emily McGregor
Pile of herring fish

Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) Fisheries Assessment Manager, Emily McGregor explains what is required for a reduction fishery to be considered sustainable. 

A reduction fishery is one that uses, or ‘reduces’, its catch to produce fishmeal or fish oil rather than for direct human consumption. These fisheries typically target small pelagic (midwater) species like anchovies, herring and capelin. Other species lower down the food chain, like krill are also caught for reduction.

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Could genetics help sustain yellowfin tuna?

by Beth Askham
Yellowfin tuna swimming underwater - stock image

DNA research is not just for gazing into our own distant past, we can also use genetic maps to track the great-grandmothers of tuna. One of the winners of the 2016 Marine Stewardship Council Scholarship Research Program, Rachel B. Mullins has used her funding to conduct next-generation DNA sequencing of yellowfin tuna.

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Meet the MSC: the women working for sustainable seafood

by Natalie Frade-Blanchart
Laura-IWD-header

To celebrate International Women’s Day, we spoke to some of our many female MSC staff members. We wanted to know why they decided to work in the (sustainable) seafood sphere and what challenges they face in a traditionally male-dominated industry.

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Improving supply chains for tuna in Indonesia

by Momo Kochen
Indonesian fisherman holding up large skipjack tuna fish

One of the 2016 recipients of our Global Fisheries Sustainability Fund (GFSF), Masyarakat Dan Perikanan Indonesia (MDPI), are an independent foundation based in Bali, Indonesia. Their work focuses on small-scale artisanal fisheries and supports fishing communities and supply chains in moving towards sustainability. Their Director of Programs and Research, Momo Kochen, talks about the progress of their project working towards improving traceability within tuna supply chains in Indonesia.

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How sustainable lobster is making an impact on Chinese New Year

by Emily Tripp
Chinese New Year lanterns with blessing text

Lunar New Year celebrations began 28 January and continue for two weeks – it’s the longest holiday on the Chinese calendar. This time celebrations mark the Year of the Rooster, but I’m here to talk about another animal important to Chinese New Year: lobster.

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